Posts Tagged ‘Inventor’

forum

Solid Edge ST3 operating system requirements and information

Monday, January 31st, 2011

Solid Edge ST3 has been certified to run on the following:

  • Windows XP Professional operating system (32-bit or 64-bit)
  • Windows Vista Business or Vista Enterprise operating system (32-bit or 64-bit)
  • Windows 7 Enterprise, Ultimate or Professional (32-bit or 64-bit)
  • Internet Explorer 8 (IE 6.0 meets minimum requirements)

 Note

Internet Explorer is not required to be the default browser.

The 64-bit version of Solid Edge requires Microsoft 64-bit Windows XP, 64-bit Vista, or 64-bit Windows 7 operating system on Intel EM64T or AMD64 processors.

Solid Edge is certified to run as a 32-bit application on 64-bit Windows XP, 64-bit Vista, or 64-bit Windows 7. If you run this configuration, please be aware of the following known issues:

  • The Status and Project tabs do not display on the File Properties dialog box if activated from Windows Explorer.
  •   Solid Edge Web Parts do not display if you run the 64-bit version of Internet Explorer. You are prompted to install the .NET framework. Use the 32-bit Internet Explorer as a work-around.

 Note

Solid Edge stops certifying new releases against an operating system shortly after Microsoft drops mainstream support for it. As a result, Windows ME, Windows 98, Windows NT 4.0, and Windows 2000 are not supported. Solid Edge will not install on these operating systems. It is not recommended that you run Solid Edge on Server operating systems.

 

Hardware system requirements

Solid Edge is not supported on Intel Itanium processors.

 

Windows XP recommended system configuration

  •  32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor
  • Windows XP Professional with Service Pack 3
  • At least 2 GB RAM
  • True Color (32-bit) or 16 million colors (24-bit)
  • Screen Resolution: 1280 x 1024 (or higher, following the manufacturer’s recommendations)

 

Windows XP minimum system configuration

  • 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor
  • Windows XP Professional with Service Pack 3
  • At least 1GB RAM
  • 65K colors
  • Screen Resolution: 1280 x 1024 (or higher, following the manufacturer’s recommendations)
  • 2.4 GB disk space required for installation

 

Vista recommended system configuration

  • 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor
  • Windows Vista Business or Enterprise Service Pack 1 or 2
  • At least 2 GB RAM
  • True Color (32-bit) or 16 million colors (24-bit)
  • Screen Resolution: 1280 x 1024 (or higher, following the manufacturer’s recommendations)
  • Windows Vista Aero requires a Direct X 9–class graphics processor that supports the following:
    • WDDM driver
    • Pixel Shader 2.0
    • 32 bits per pixel
    • 256 MB graphics memory

 

 Vista minimum system configuration

  • 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor
  • Windows Vista Business or Enterprise
  • At least 1GB RAM
  • 65K Colors
  • Screen Resolution: 1280 x 1024 (or higher, following the manufacturer’s recommendations)
  • 2.4 GB disk space required for installation

 

 Windows 7 recommended system configuration

  • 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor
  • Windows 7 Professional, Ultimate, or Enterprise
  • At least 2GB RAM
  • True Color (32–bit) or 16 million colors (24–bit)
  • Screen Resolution: 1280 x 1024 (or higher, following the manufacturer’s recommendations)

 

 Windows 7 minimum system configuration

  • 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor
  • Windows 7 Professional, Ultimate, or Enterprise
  • At least 1GB RAM
  • 65K Colors
  • Screen Resolution: 1280 x 1024 (or higher, following the manufacturer’s recommendations)
  • 2.4 GB disk space required for installation

 

SSE2 Instruction Set

Solid Edge ST3 installation will check for the presence of a processor which supports SSE2 (Streaming SIMD Extensions 2). Without the support for SSE2, the installation will fail.

The following is a list of common processors that support the SSE2 instruction set:

  • AMD K8–based CPUs (Athlon 64, Sempron 64, Turion 64, etc.)
  • AMD Phenom CPUs
  • Intel NetBurst-based CPUs (Pentium 4, Xeon, Celeron, CeleronD, etc)
  • Intel Pentium M and Celeron M
  • Intel Core-based CPUs (Core Duo, Core Solo, etc)
  • Intel Core 2-based CPUs (Core 2 Duo, Core 2 Quad, etc)
  • Intel Core i7
  • Intel Atom

 Note

This not a comprehensive list, so consult your hardware manufacturer’s product information to ensure SSE2 is supported.

 

Windows 7 and Vista Recommendations

 Turn off User Account Control (UAC)

If you run the Windows 7 or Vista operating system, it is strongly recommended that you turn off User Account Control (UAC). If UAC is on, you may experience problems with slow network connections, problems with Solid Edge installation and removal, problems with licensing, Insight web parts, and others.

To turn off UAC in the Vista operating system, choose Control Panel®User Accounts and Family Safety®User Accounts. Set the User Account Control to Off.

To turn off UAC in the Windows 7 operating system, choose Control Panel®User Accounts. Click System and Security, then under Action Center, click Change User Account Control Settings. Set the User Account Control to Never Notify.

 Turn off Windows Vista Aero

If you will be working with View and Markup or the Solid Edge Viewer you should turn off Windows Vista Aero. To turn off Windows Vista Aero.

If Control Panel Home is selected at the far left of the screen, click Appearance and Personalization®Personalization®Window Color and Appearance.

If Classic View is selected at the far left of the screen, click Personalization®Window Color and Appearance.

If Window Color and Appearance is visible at the top of the window, click Open classic appearance properties for more color options. In the Appearance Settings window, change the color scheme from Windows Aero and click OK.

If Window Color and Appearance is not displayed at the top of the window, you should see Appearance Settings. Check to make sure the color scheme is not set to Windows Aero and click OK.

Note

 If you see the Appearance Settings dialog box instead of the Window Color and Appearance window, the theme might not be set to Windows Vista, the color scheme might not be set to Windows Aero, or the computer might not meet the minimum hardware requirements for running Windows Aero.

 

SQL Express 2008

If you installed Solid Edge ST2, SQL Express 2005 SP2 was loaded on your machine. With ST3, SQL Express 2008 is installed. SQL Express 2005 SP2 (which was installed with ST2) will not be removed in case you are using it with other applications. If you are not using SQL Express 2005 SP2, we recommend that you remove it via Control Panel®Add/Remove Programs.

 

Display System Requirements and Information

Solid Edge will run on graphics drivers that support Windows XP or Windows Vista or Windows 7. For optimal performance, it is recommended to use a professional Graphics card that is designed for CAD applications. A 256MB graphic card or higher is recommended when working with large assemblies or complex parts.

When running Solid Edge, if you experience an abnormally high abort rate, parts disappearing, or other graphic anomalies you may not be using the appropriate graphics driver. For details, visit http://support.ugs.com/online_library/certification/

notice

Why Synchronous Modeling is a Significant Leap Forward in Productivity

Tuesday, July 14th, 2009service

Before we get into why synchronous modeling is this significant leap forward in productivity, let’s review what the previous major milestones in the CAD industry were. There have actually been few major milestones in the CAD industry over the past decades. The first was the introduction of 2D CAD systems. These systems digitized the drafting board. I remember designers using drafting boards suggest that they could draw something faster using a drawing board versus a CAD system. However, as 2D systems matured their benefits were clear. They provided a fast means of copying and editing manufacturing drawings and in many cases were much more portable than their physical counterpart.

Later, 3D explicit modeling CAD systems were introduced. These systems added tremendous visualization benefits. It was easier to communicate ideas to people who couldn’t read blue prints. This level of CAD was beyond just being useful for manufacturing drawings. These systems had the ability to create and edit digital versions of physical models.

3D explicit modeling CAD systems were similar also offered a fast means of copying and editing models and were much more portable than their physical counterpart. One of the other benefits that eventually came from these 3D modeling systems was that drawing views could be extracted from the 3D model. This automated a significant portion of the manufacturing drawing creation process.

The next big step in the CAD industry was the introduction of parametric history-based modeling systems. These systems offered an ability to control geometry with geometric and dimensional constraints, rather than explicitly manipulating the geometry as you would with the explicit systems. Although it may not be readily apparent, history-based modeling systems have qualities much like programming languages. They have the ability to make large scale design changes of entire drawing packages by programming design intent into a model. However, for users to take advantage of these capabilities they typically require many years of experience with a given system and they must think like programmers, not just designers. This steep learning curve and skill requirement often forces businesses to miss out on one of this system’s most significant productivity benefits. What typically happens is customers do not take advantage of this design automation capability and don’t reuse data as often as they could.

The latest major milestone in the CAD industry is synchronous modeling, which combines capabilities of explicit and parametric history-based modeling. One of its major benefit is the reduced need to pre-program design intent into a model to make large scale changes more efficient during reuse. With synchronous modeling large scale changes can be made to an entire assembly similar to how it is done in an explicit based system. (e.g.: Drag a window around a portion of the model and the pull it to resize it).

What makes synchronous modeling systems so different is a fundamental change in the way the model is presented. Unlike parametric history-based systems, part models from a synchronous system are not dependant on a program-like list of features that are compiled in order and each feature is dependent on a previous model entity. Instead, the synchronous model is a flexible body that can be pulled and stretched with direct or parametric controls. That may not sound like much, but it is. This flexible body means top down design edits are much more easily performed without having to go through convoluted processes to create relationships within the assembly. It also means that imported geometry is much more editable and reusable.

Now there is more to Synchronous Technology than just the flexible body. A unique set of interface tools allow for fast and easy editing. Some allow you to directly control the model and manage edits. Some allow you to manage selections and create geometric and dimensional parameters. There are several tools and they will all have a learning curve. However, the learning curve is not so great. Especially when compared to the benefits.

You may think “So what, I can do the same things with history-based modeling and I already know how to use it to get my job done. Why would I want to change?” That was the same initial mentality some drafters using drawing boards had when 2D CAD systems came out, or the same mentality the 2D CAD users had when they first tried a 3D parametric history-based modeler. I have been using Synchronous Technology for several months now and I am amazed at its flexibility and efficiency. Someone said to me “Synchronous Technology seems so easy it feels like cheating.” Whichever way you look at it, Synchronous Technology is the latest major milestone in the CAD industry. It brings fundamental changes in the way you can create digital models with much more productively.

Posted in Tech Tips | No Comments »

faq